Posts Tagged ‘anarchist’

Saturday, February 4, 3-8 PM

@ The Wildcat (Seattle)

 

Several different anti-capitalist tendencies have come together in the Occupy movement. Now is a chance for us to meet publicly and clarify where we agree and disagree on a few key points.

This event is free & open to the public. It will be audio-recorded, and selections will be published online for the benefit of anti-capitalists everywhere.

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Reports from Seattle on D12

Posted: December 14, 2011 by globaloccupation in 2011, December, seattle, statements
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

In this post, two somewhat different perspectives on the Seattle port shutdown by participants:

(1) “Occupy Seattle: A New Phase for the Workers’ Movement”

(2) “Seattle Port Shutdown – Success!”

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In Defense of the Revolutionary Politics and Actions of Occupy Oakland
Introduction

I went on strike on November 2nd in Oakland. I am not from Oakland, nor do I live there. I live in the Central Valley of California, about an hour and a half away. I work two jobs. I pay a mortgage. I am a member of a union. According to the discourse of the mainstream media, I’m middle class. According to the welfare office, I live in poverty. According to the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ movement, I’m part of the 99%.

I consider myself neither. I am part of the working class, which through our waged and unwaged labors creates everything. But I am also a proletarian. I strive for a world without class, towards a human community free of capitalism. I have been an anarchist for over 10 years. I was not in Oakland when the camp was raided, but I had been to the occupation several times before and many of my friends, from former Panthers to anarchists, were involved. On the night of Tuesday, October 25th, I, along with thousands others, attempted to retake Oscar Grant Plaza. I returned the next night for the general assembly which called for a general strike. I returned for the strike and in the days that followed began working on this piece in response to some of the critics of the day’s events.
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http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/11/03/18697018.php

Last night, after one of the most remarkable days of resistance in recent history, some of us within Occupy Oakland took an important next step: we extended the occupation to an unused building near Oscar Grant Plaza. We did this, first off, in order to secure the shelter and space from which to continue organizing during the coming winter months. But we also hoped to use the national spotlight on Oakland to encourage other occupations in colder, more northern climates to consider claiming spaces and moving indoors in order to resist the repressive force of the weather, after so bravely resisting the police and the political establishment. We want this movement to be here next Spring, and claiming unused space is, in our view, the most plausible way forward for us at this point. We had plans to start using this space today as a library, a place for classes and workshops, as well as a dormitory for those with health conditions. We had already begun to move in books from the library.

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http://www.bayofrage.com/from-the-bay/occupyoakland-one-week-strong-at-oscar-grant-plaza/

Posted by on Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Social rebels from around Oakland have descended upon Oscar Grant Plaza and have created a genuine, autonomous space free of police and unwelcoming to politicians. Whereas other occupations have invited the police and politicians, or have negotiated with them, Occupy Oakland has carved a line in the cement. That line of demarcation says: if you pass this, if you try and break up or over shadow this autonomous space, you are well aware, as observed over the last couple of years, what we are capable of.

This article is a report back on the first week at Occupy Oakland, a reflection on problems we have been facing and some thoughts on moving the occupation forward; onto some next level shit.
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"Chase Burning" - painting by Alex Schaefer

I got a certain amount of shit for cosigning this Cimethinc. “Letter from Anarchists” to occupiers, but what really strikes me is that anarchists and occupiers have become two distinct–albeit overlapping–groups. It’s become even more apparent in the streets. When I was at Occupy DC over the weekend, a guy who I would guess circles his A’s complained about being pushed from the street into the police-protected march by another occupier. I’ve seen the same thing happen in New York, and I’m willing to bet it’s happened elsewhere. There have been rumors out of Chicago that some occupiers have printed out flyers with the names and pictures of “known anarchists,” and certain committee members at Wall Street have grumbled about rooting out autonomous actors. In this context, the Crimethinc. letter seems restrained:

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http://tidesofflame.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/tof8read.pdf

Occupy Buildings

Anarchists have been occupying space
for well over a hundred years now.
The same old problems keep arising
whenever we do so: the police attack and
murder us, the middle class condemns
us, and the capitalists starve us out. But
we keep trying even though it doesn’t get
any easier. If you are a regular reader of
Tides of Flame, you may have gathered
that anarchist history is blacked-out and
nearly forgotten. In the spirit of keeping
the flame alive, we’ll fill you in on some
examples and methods of anarchist occupations. The picture on the front cover of this
issue is of the Ungdomshuset (Youth House) in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Since the turn of the 20th century, the building had housed various leftist col-
lectives. Government repression made it difficult for radical groups to find places
for meetings and so these groups built the house with their own hands. Con-
struction on what was then called the Folkets Hus (People’s House) was fin-
ished in 1897, and for the next decades it served as a hub for subversive activity.
International Women’s Day was created at a meeting in this house in 1910. In
1918, the storming of the Danish Stock Exchange was planned there. The house
was located at 69 Jagtvej, and the symbol of Gemini eventually became its em-
blem. In 1982, a group of anarchists took over the house and named it Ungdomshuset..

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